Khaled Hosseini Afghanistan Pride Analysis

1881 Words8 Pages
Khaled Hosseini: Afghanistan’s Pride
When people think about Afghanistan, war, violence, and destruction usually come to mind, but there are Afghan citizens who still have hope in their country. Influential author Khaled Hosseini, who is endeared and respected by readers all over the world, portrays the destruction in Afghanistan through his own eyes in his novels. A true humanitarian, Hosseini is a man of the people, raising awareness for Afghanistan, working as a doctor, and being an active goodwill envoy. He was even named Humanitarian of the Year in 2006 for his devotion to helping refugees, such as the Sudanese. He also won the award for The Kite Runner’s overall impact on the world, showing the distressed lives of Afghan citizens. Doctor,
…show more content…
In this novel, Amir and his father, Baba, are Pashtuns whereas their servants, Hassan and his father, are Hazaras. Typically in Afghanistan Pashtuns treat Hazaras poorly; they feel they are not worthy of respect. However, Amir and Baba consider Hassan and his father to be like family and are kind to them, unlike other Pashtuns. Baba even goes out of his way to get Hassan’s cleft lip fixed for his birthday. Amir discusses Baba’s thoughtfulness by saying, “Baba never missed Hassan’s birthday… He bought him a toy truck on year, an electric locomotive and train track set another year” (Hosseini 44). Ultimately, Baba and Amir do not follow their ethnic group’s treatment of Hazaras and instead of abusing them are…show more content…
Similarly, the two men enjoyed kite flying during their childhood. Kite flying was Amir and Hosseini’s hobby and incorporated happiness into Hosseini and Amir’s childhoods, who also both happened to live in the Wazir Akbar Khan district of Kabul, Afghanistan during this time. Khaled Hosseini was born in Kabul, comparingly to the fictional character, Amir, who describes his homeland as, “...Wazir Akbar Khan district, a new and affluent neighborhood in the northern part of Kabul” (Hosseini 4). Although Amir and Hosseini have similarities, their lives do differ in one major way. Amir adopts a child in The Kite Runner, an event that has not occurred in Khaled Hosseini’s life (Hosseini 359). Hosseini and his wife have their own children and did not adopt from any orphanage in
Open Document