Kill Bill Film Analysis

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While considering a movie for an assignment on violence in the media, I was immediately reminded of the movie both written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, titled, Kill Bill. Kill Bill is a two part study in revenge which, at one point, has two women fighting - one of which has only one eye at the beginning of the scene, and, well, you can see what happens later in your own time - if you are so inclined. But while reviewing those movies I recalled another flick that has a scene so shocking, and so powerful, I had to reconsider my selection. Going back to 1996, I recalled a movie directed by Ron Howard. If you are old enough you will know Ron as the child actor, Opie, on the Andy Mayberry Show. But, in 1996, Ron released a movie starring Mel Gibson, and a cast of mostly unknown actors - many of whom have since gone on to become more common in film and TV than Mel himself. Ransom was a movie that I first saw at a discount movie theater, and when I walked out I commented to a friend that I was happy I only paid $2.00 for that feeling. Not that the movie wasn 't worth seeing, as it was, but the feelings that are evoked when the child pee 's his pants, well, let 's say they provoke some rather hostile imaginings. So, how do I write about this scene with-out spoiling the movie for those whom have not yet viewed it? I will review this movie…show more content…
In this example of violence in the media, I witness a young child who is kidnapped, sensory deprived by being blindfolded, restrained by being cuffed and shackled, isolated in a bed in a room, fed inadequately, and left uncertain of what the future would hold. Being in a state of total helplessness, this child holds on to whatever strength he could muster. The child, limited to hearing, imprints on the voice of his captors. This memory is so emblazoned in his memory that when he hears the voice, the tone, the pattern of speech, he immediately feels threatened, and as if still restrained, freezes in trauma and urinates on

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