Killing The Dressmaker Analysis

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I believe the resolution Cahal attempts to achieve is one of repentance. I think Cahal believes that if he can eliminate all of the things in his life that have caused him to feel guilty, he can escape the consequences he has made for himself. After the hit and run incident with the child, he tried to avoid the situation as much as possible. However, guilt and fear slowly eat away at his mind and force him to confront the truth: he has killed a child. It seems that belief and a religion are two underlying themes in this story, what with the weeping religious statue. Since Cahal knows what he did was a mistake, I believe he does these actions to make up for all of the bad things he’s done in the past, including killing the dressmaker’s child. In the beginning of the story, Cahal lacked religion and was skeptical and judgemental about other people’s beliefs. He was even willing to use this vulnerability against them: “He could charge them fifty euros. Pouldearg there and back, Cahal considered… but never mind that for fifty euros.” His greed and selfishness is what…show more content…
He could repent for every sin he’s ever made, but if he doesn’t confront the little girl’s mother, he won’t ever escape the heaviness inside of his soul. That’s why it was placed as the last event on his list. His ending insight on talking to the dressmaker is what will give him closure in the end. “Even though she didn’t look up, he wanted to go to her and knew that one day he would.” When Cahal is ready he will finally close the lid on his suffering and pain, but before he can do that, he must work up the courage and bravery to accomplish this daunting task. I believe his spirituality has been strengthened by this unfortunate situation, as well as his over all sense of himself. But the true test was turning to religion to address all of the wrong he has done, in order to make everything
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