Kindred Film Analysis

857 Words4 Pages
The role of costumes in films is extraordinarily complex and often under looked. Costume designs must adequately reflect the personalities, time-period, and even social distinctions of the character that they represent. However, the role of costumes can extend further. Costumes, in some cases can be used to make implicit statements, thus supporting the directors purpose or statement. Such is expressed through the costumes displayed in Barry Jenkins’ Kindred. The film follows Chiron, who through three different chronicles, experiences a fundamental transformation as a character when he is forced to embrace society's notion of black masculinity rather than accept his self-identity as a black man. Chiron eventually makes the transitions to society’s…show more content…
Chiron is faced with a social worker who wishes to help Chiron achieve justice. The social worker, a successful black woman as depicted by her title and business attire, tenaciously suggests methods for Chiron to attain justice such as reporting the attackers to the authorities. However, Chiron rejects all her suggestions and begins to cry before immediately regaining his composure. Through her crisp business attire which directly contrasts the hoodlum outfits previously shown, Chiron’s principal represents an alternative for Chiron’s upcoming transition to a damaging life of…show more content…
Chiron is shirtless in this scene to represent primitivity. Primitivity symbolizes two very important characteristics. One, being primal is often defined as the first stage in an evolutionary process, similar to how Chiron evolves to adopt black masculinity. Two, rage and violence is often characterized as a primal instinct which foreshadows the upcoming scene. Chiron looks at himself in the mirror, and reflects upon all the damage he has taken from Terrell and the other bullies at school. These are Chiron’s final moments before he decides to act by taking revenge, thus embracing society’s notion of black
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