King Kreon's Compromise In Antigone

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Throughout Sophocles’ tragic play, Antigone, main characters King Kreon and Antigone dramatically argue without compromise over the recently deceased brother of Antigone, Polynices. Antigone, while attempting to mourn for her family, symbolically buries Polynices, going against the King’s decree (93-100). Out of anger, and an effort to establish his power, Kreon sentences her to an undeserving death just because she decided to respect her kin (441-496). In this case, I sympathize with Antigone more than Kreon because she peacefully acted on her beliefs knowing the consequences at stake. It takes a lot to stand up for what you believe in, especially knowing that the outcome will not bode well for you.
After brothers Polynices and Eteocles kill each other in battle, newfound King Kreon
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Although he makes this decree with intentions to unite the city, his unwillingness to compromise with Antigone on the matter is childish and stubborn. While degrading Antigone in his eloquently put death sentence to her, he never attempts to rationalize her actions. To Kreon, Antigone simply wants to cause trouble by rudely “burying” a traitor, but he does not seem to understand the deep connection that family members have with one another. This was not simply some wandering joker looking to cause upheaval. This was a sister trying to bury her dead brother. He should feel some level of sympathy for her. After unwillingly compromising with Antigone, his son Haimon attempts to talk some sense into him (635-765). At first, Haimon enters the room calmly and more than willing to talk, just upon hearing rumors that his father sentenced his fiancé to death. This type of patience exemplifies the great amount of maturity that Haimon has, which does not seem to be found in his father. Nevertheless, as
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