Kingdom Keepers Disney After Dark Analysis

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There are many language examples within the novel, Kingdom Keepers: Disney after Dark by Ridley Pearson. Kingdom Keepers: Disney after Dark is a novel that depicts the story of five children who become Disney Host Interactives and have to save the Disney Amusement Park from the Overtakers, a group of evil characters. In addition to their standard lives at school, the five teenagers need to constantly be aware of the situations at Disney. One example of a language example is its title, which is used to introduce the book. This language example correlates to the theme of, “Good and evil coexist.” This theme is evident as villains and figures of evil are often associated with darkness, the protagonists always beat the antagonists, and heroes need to cooperate. Villains and figures of evil are often associated with darkness, many times throughout the course of the book, Kingdom Keepers: Disney After Dark. For example, this is evident in the quote, “The crowd applauded as her hair changed color, from jet black to a sandy blond. Her eyebrows and eyelashes became lighter as well, and few freckles appeared on her cheeks.” (315) As she turns from evil to good, Jez loses all the dark colors within herself. This shows how the blackness of her hair symbolizes her evilness. Another example of darkness symbolizing evil is in the quote, “If the hero and heroine go off to live happily ever after, then what…show more content…
One of these language examples is its title, which correlates to the theme, “Good and evil coexist.” This theme is supported throughout the novel as figures of evil are often associated with darkness, good often beats the evil, and heroes need to team up in order to accomplish their goal. This theme is important in understanding the novel as a whole because it is the reason the five DHIs must cross over every night, fight the Overtakers, and protect Disney as a
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