Knowledge In Victorian Literature

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Knowledge can be perceived as the production of one or more human beings. It can be the work of a single individual arrived at as a result of a number of factors including the ways of knowing. Such individual knowledge is called personal knowledge. But knowledge can also be the work of a group of people working together either in concert or, more likely, separated by time or geography. The acquisition of knowledge can be done through various ways of knowing or complex cognitive processes. This process of acquiring knowledge is what distinguishes the two types of knowledge – shared knowledge and personal knowledge apart. The difference between them, however, is a mere thin line. Mathematic theories that are arrived at by an individual suggests…show more content…
This is evident in the chronological order of the Victorian novel. Victorian literature often refers to the world as it is. Victorian writers never question why it is in such a way or how anything came about but rather accept their surroundings as exactly how they see it. For example in Great Expectations Charles Dickens wrote, “Spring is the time of year when it is summer in the sun and winter in the shade.” He merely stated what he saw but never doubts how its existence came about. Modernists, however, as a result of the First World War lost sight of the overarching goal of humanity which had always been present in every progression of generation. Writers were devastated and through the process of, mainly, reasoning and emotion began to doubt the purpose. This is evident in the fragmented style of the writing. Modern prose often begins at the end, and jumps around from event to event. It is more scattered and less hopeful. With the advancing technology, the propagation of information becomes more rapid and open to the public. Through sense perceptions, reasons, faith and emotion, the public perceive the results of the war differently. This shift in the literature work clearly shown the supremacy of the results of the war over the old traditions, hence, further suggests that the shared knowledge is more…show more content…
They did what is called a T-shirt sniffing test where 49 women and 44 men were selected for their variety of MHC (major histocompatibility complex) gene types and parents' MHC genes. This test is conducted in order to investigate mate compatibility through MHC-dissimilarity odour preference. Each man was given a clean T-shirts to wear for two nights before returning it to the scientists. Then the women had to sniff T-shirt odours, but they had no idea what were they smelling. They were asked to say which odours they would prefer if they had to smell them all the time. Notably, the women preferred the odours of men who shared the same type of a few MHC genes, or alleles, with themselves. The most appealing odour donors shared 1.4 alleles on average, whereas the least appealing shared 0.6 alleles. What's more, these matching alleles were ones the women had inherited from their fathers and not from their mothers. Through their senses, those women demonstrates how their shared knowledge i.e. the T-shirts was influenced by the men’s personal knowledge i.e. their odours. The process of choosing their preferred T-shirts is done via their personal emotion and sense perceptions. Meanwhile, if the experiment is to be looked at from the angle where one consider the fact that it is about
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