Kra In Hell Analysis

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“A poem can be made of anything.“ This statement of William Carlos Williams in his work ‘Kora in Hell’ has become a universal characteristic for Imagist’s works. The innovative, early 20th century countermovement to preceding literary eras, known as the beginning of modernism “emphasized precision and treatment of the ‘thing’ over florid language and emotional affect, which the Imagists associated with Romanticism“ (Stinson 61-62). When considering Williams’s poem “The Red Wheelbarrow“, it could easily be said that it is just a poem about a wheelbarrow, but the first two lines signal that there is an important message in the poem. However, through contrasting the reading of the present and the imagining of the absent regarding “The Red Wheelbarrow“,…show more content…
Coming back to the visual aspect of the poem, it is noticeable that each of the four stanzas resembles a wheelbarrow. Furthermore, every stanza contains a pair of lines which consists of three words on the first line and one single word on the second. Between those stanzas, there are syntactic enjambements and within each pair of lines a morphological enjambement can be found, meaning that an entity of words is split up onto two lines. Heinrich Plett distinguishes between those two kinds of enjambements because a “morphological enjambement implies a stronger deviation than the syntactic one, since a morphological unit has stronger coherence than a syntactic one“ (Plett 140). The morphological enjambement 's in “The Red Wheelbarrow“ are “depends / upon“, “wheel / barrow“, “rain / water“ and “white / chickens“. In fact, those entities always consist of a mono-syllabic word on the first and a disyllabic word on the second line. Discussing syllables, it is striking that both the first and the last stanzas start with a four syllable line, and the second and third stanzas both have three syllables in the first line. In every stanza the second line has always got two syllables. Even though the poem has no end-rhymes, there are internal assonances as all the diphthongs in the poem are repeated: “so - barrow“, “glazed - rain“,…show more content…
Those are present elements that constantly invoke their contrasting counterpart, in this case the absent elements (“Analyzing Textuality“ 33). In “The Red Wheelbarrow“, people, temporal progression and feelings are absent. All of these things are only introduced by the reader who might ask questions such as: Who placed the wheelbarrow there? Was happened before the storm and what will happen next? The reader might also have an emotional connection to one of the objects and relate feelings to them. Nevertheless, regarding only what is present in the poem, the reader realises that there are only objects — the red wheelbarrow, the rainwater and the white chickens. Time does not play a role in the poem as it only describes one static moment. The lack of feelings is compensated by the presence of senses. The sense of sight is stimulated by the words “red“, “glazed with“, “beside“ and “white“. The wetness of the rainwater and the feathers of the chickens evoke the sense of touch. Olfaction can be related to the smell that lies in the air after it rained. The sense of hearing is generated by the sound the chickens might make. In addition to that, another set of present-absent binary oppositions has to be discussed. According to Ferdinand de Saussure’s theory of the linguistic sign, the individual words of the
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