Gobbo's 'Ethical And Moral Conflicts In The Film'

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1. What are the major ethical/moral conflicts in this scene? Identify as many as you can, then choose one to analyze in depth. Lancelot Gobbo’s battle with his own conscience. On the one hand, he has his conscience, which pushes him toward obedience to Shylock, (his master). On the other is his prejudice, which sees Jews as devils. He says ““Fiend,” say I, “you counsel well.” To be ruled by my conscience I should stay with the Jew my master, who, God bless the mark, is a kind of devil. And to run away from the Jew I should be ruled by the fiend, who, saving your reverence, is the devil himself.” (2.2.). Judgement of a person by their religion Lancelot Gobbo’s decision to leave his master is solely based on prejudice. He does not judge Sherlock’s…show more content…
He waits only until his father grieves to reveal that he is, in fact, not dead. He says, “Nay, indeed, if you had your eyes, you might fail of the knowing me. It is a wise father that knows his own child.”…show more content…
It seems Lancelot takes advantage of his father 's blindness and the fact that he doesn 't really know him. He says to Lancelot, “Alack the day, I know you not, young gentleman. But I pray you, tell me, is my boy, God rest his soul, alive or dead?” (2.2. 65-69). It’s an interesting parallel to the relationship between Jessica and Shylock. We 're never really clear on whether they love each other, but it is clear that Shylock doesn 't really know who Jessica is. 3. Why is this scene important to the play? What theme/issue does it engage and how? This scene is important to the play because it demonstrates one common theme throughout the play; demonization of jews. In these scene, Lancelot want to quit his employment with Sherlock because he is the devil’s reincarnation. This theme also engages the issue of unhealthy relationships. Throughout the play, we see that people betray and lie to each other. In this act, Lancelot says, “as I have set up my rest to run away, so I will not rest till I have run some ground. My master’s a very Jew. Give him a present. Give him a halter. I am famished in his service.” (2.2.
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