Langston Hughes Influence On African American Culture

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The term Harlem Renaissance “ is a reference to the literary movement” (Jimoh 4) that deeply affected America’s culture . The Harlem Renaissance, originally called the New Negro Movement, created the most influential movement in African American literary history. The term “New Negro” characterized outspoken African Americans and their refusal to follow Jim Crow racial segregation laws. Harlem became a big African American town after the Great Migration. The Great Migration occurred when African Americans left rural South for the urban North. Harlem became the cultural center for African Americans to express their artistic talent. In Harlem, writing, art, music, and theater became more important to African Americans, to express their culture…show more content…
Langston Hughes wrote politically challenging poems about the government. In “Let America Be America Again” brings people to the attention that African Americans never got the treatment they deserved. Hughes realizes that “there's never been equality for him” (Hughes 1) in America. Hughes, who traveled across the country, realized that racism appeared everywhere. During the Harlem Renaissance, his poetry “condemns white oppression” (Gohar 1) and encourages “racial pride” (Gohar 1). Hughes also questions the government and their biased towards a certain race. Hughes realized that “he do not need my freedom when he’s dead” (Democracy 1). Hughes pushed the limit by writing political pieces that often made white people feel guilty. Different from other authors of the Harlem Renaissance, Hughes refused to make his writing overly complicated. Hughes used dialect of African Americans and themes that they related to. Many people at the time dislike Hughes writing style because he wrote about African Americans in an non-glamourous way. He wrote about their hardship and suffering as well as their successes. However, this embarrassed African Americans because they knew the possibility of white people reading it and they disliked the idea of white people knowing their weaknesses. Hughes, although he struggled, became the first African American to make his lively solely off his writing. Hughes continued to
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