Leadership Role In Military Leadership

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Introduction The majority of military general providers or general medical officers (GMOs) work in medical treatment facilities or operational units all over the world. GMOs are even assigned with operational units that are in hostile environments such as Iraq or Afghanistan. GMOs are medical providers that have graduated from an accredited medical school and have passed all requirements to receive a Medical Doctorate. Once they pass basic Officer Candidate School, they are automatically assigned the rank of O-3, Lieutenants in the military. Most GMOs have never received any type of leadership training. The majority of GMOs rarely have jobs while attending medical school so they do not possess leadership or work experience. Being assigned…show more content…
They are great clinicians but have a hard time distinguishing between the provider and leader role, they lack the skills to lead their staff in personal growth or achieving organizational task. The purpose of this study is to explore how GMOs think about leadership in military medicine, specifically their leadership roles and challenges. A qualitative study is the appropriate method to fully obtain the GMOs perspective on their leadership roles and challenges they have to experience. The study’s aim is to provide prospective GMO’s a better understanding of what is expected in the military and what leadership is required to become an effective military leader and clinician. In this study the following research questions are used. First, what are the experiences of GMOs in military health care organizations? Second, what challenges does GMOs encounter when placed in dual clinical and leadership…show more content…
Participants explained that there is challenges in military leadership role due to having duo roles. GMOs are trained to have outstanding bed side manners and customer service for the sake of the patients. It is difficult to change from a clinical to a leadership role because a leader tends to be more firm, strict, and direct with their staff. Also, the participants shared that it is difficult motivate and increase employees growth due to lack of leadership training. Participants explained the challenges when leading peers. As clinicians they seldom question their peer’s practices, so as a leader they have difficulty confronting their peer’s behaviors. Participants noted that the major reason they cannot lead their peers is because they do not want to be seen as the bad guy for enforcing the rules. Participants shared that it was difficult to lead their staff because they had no prior leadership or work experience. Most of the participants only attend an educational institution compared to subordinates that had years of leadership and military

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