Leadership Theory In Leadership

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Additionally, Baron found that the rise of the professional manager over the past several decades suggests that increasing and different management and leadership skills are high on the agenda for effective culture management. Baron (1995) found in his research that organizations that have tried to proactively exploit new opportunities in the environment experienced successful culture change. As leadership research has grown and expanded, an even broader look at leadership has emerged: a focus on the organizational culture (Schein, 1985).Research has generally supported this theory, and its value deals with the investigation of each follower’s relationship with the leader as opposed to a general or average leadership style. As a different example…show more content…
Leaders must be able to adapt to change, depending on the culture, as the environment shifts and develops. Leaders are also involved in managing the culture by establishing an explicit strategic direction, communicating that direction, and defining the organizational vision and values. In other words, additional skills are needed in today’s leaders so that they will be able to manage the organizational culture. This line of research, however, has not Leadership theory 273 identified a model for different styles of leadership given different cultural factors. Other leadership theories emerged out of this work, including the vertical dyad linkage theory, also known as the leader-member exchange theory (Graen, 1976).This theory explains the nature of the relationship between leaders and followers and how this relationship impacts the leadership process. For leaders to be effective, according to this view, issues related to the culture must be clearly identified. One conclusion that can be drawn is that leaders need to work within the culture to be most…show more content…
Expectancy theory proposes that people engage in particular behaviors based on the probability that the behavior will be followed by a certain outcome and the value of that outcome (Vroom, 1964).Transactional leadership stems from more traditional views of workers and organizations, and it involves the position power of the leader to use followers for task completion (Burns, 1978).Leadership, then, is not only the process and activity of the person who is in a leadership position, but also encompasses the environment this leader creates and how this leader responds to the surroundings, as well as the particular skills and activities of the people being led. Transformational leadership, however, searches for ways to help motivate followers by satisfying higher-order needs and more fully engaging them in the process of the work (Bass, 1985).Goal setting theory takes a somewhat different approach, suggesting that people are motivated to achieve goals, and their intentions drive their behavior (Locke, 1968).Additional motivation theories include expectancy theory, equity theory, goal setting, and
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