Leppitt's Integrated Model Analysis

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There are some notable similarities and differences between RAND 's Six Steps and Leppitt 's Integrated Model regarding how they address change management. Although the two are very different, they key to highlight and foundation established between the two is building urgency. Light (2005) indicates that it is imperative to establish why the time to act is now in step one of RAND’s Six Steps. If the time isn’t now, don’t communicate. But if it is, you’ll have some reasons. Write them down. Furthermore, Leppitt, (2006) also describes the urgency factor in step three of the integrated model by stating you should think about why this is the moment to act. Regarding change strategy, Pettigrew (1988) says an individual would explain what…show more content…
Establishing and communicating urgency is what makes these two models different, yet Leppitt 's Integrated Model is more robust in my opinion. To start, I have never heard that fewer steps are always better when establishing and implementing a strategy. For example, because RANDs’ six steps are short and straightforward, an organization would probably use Leppitt’s model for a fleet management or leadership change. In a management change, an organization can hit step 3 (recruit the champion) and step 4 (build internal momentum) by locating a new leader and motivating team members to be upbeat of the coming change (Lennox, 1994). To go a step further, in a case like creating a new strategic position in the organization, I believe that Leppitt 's Integrated Model works better. According to Leppitt (2006), the integrated model is better suited for strategizing regarding planning resources, the life cycle of the change and monitoring change metrics. The integrated model allows for the organization to plan from the ground up highlighted in step 3, which understands the vision and strategy (Felkins, Chakiris, & Chakiris,…show more content…
According to Tarnow (2001), the organization develops short and long-term objectives, which can is done by using elements of the vision statement. Tarnow (2001) indicates a vision statement can offer more of a direction to include the perspective of corporate values when establishing organizational objectives for market-share targets, improved brand awareness, and revenue or profit goals. When using a vision statement in the strategic plan, an added element of human values is represented (Vision Statements: Part 1, 1991). Furthermore, Tarnow (2001) also states a vision may supply a direction for the organization for the next four to eight years while noting a commitment to openness, transparency, integrity towards better training and monitoring of feedback scores as a strategy to achieve higher customer
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