Literacy Narrative

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Literacy Narrative The journey of self is one of introspection. This requires self-reflection. Words are the embers that smolder within us that when ignited emerge from the depth of chaos. Writing serves as a vehicle to transport one from any literacy myths they may be harboring. These literacy myths manifest in a multitude of ways such as “I am a terrible writer,” to “I am an excellent writer.” The truth is with literacy; it is not a fixed construct and is always in flux. Through literacy, one can challenge limiting beliefs and any preconceived ideas that are derived from our assessment heavy educational system. A literacy narrative is a useful tool for turning voices into ideas that effect change. This sense of agency as a writer is a form…show more content…
A. The statement that I strongly agree with is that we teach process, not product (Murray, 1972). As we are fleshing out in this class and with our weekly readings, we are finding, that it is our responsibility as English teachers to respond to our students from a place of respect for what they may do and for what they will produce. Within all of our students there is a potential for their truth to emerge. Embedded within their truth our students will discover their voice. The vehicle for this expression is the use of language, in action. “He [student] uses language to reveal the truth to himself so that he can tell it to others. It is an exciting, eventful, evolving process.” (Murray, 1972). N. The statement that I do not agree with is according to Murray to teach unfinished writing, and glory in its unfinishedness, (1972). I find this misleading as an educator and feel that completion and closure are important aspects of the writing process. I. The statement that I found particularly interesting this week was made by Murray, “he doesn’t test his words by a rule book, but by life.” (1972). To me this demonstrates his manifesto that the emphasis of writing is on process, not product. C. The statement I found confusing was in “Basic Aims of Discourse” where Kinneavy talks affective fallacy as assuming the reaction of any given reader as an accurate indication of author’s purpose. To me, to rely on the reader to assume intention is ambiguous and potentially inaccurate.…show more content…
The most important idea that I extracted from “Major theories of Teaching Writing” was the concept of truth and that writing is learned. “One of the key features of the expressivist movement is the goal of quieting the unproductive influences that have castigated students when they have used their own unique voice.” (Collins, 2013). Truth is accessed during the writing process and this is a pure expression that for a suspended period of time needs to be arrested against assessment. “Truth, for the expressivist, is discovered through an internal apprehension, a private vision of a world that transcends the physical…[Truth] is conceived as the result of a private vision that must be constantly consulted in writing” (Berlin, 1982, pp.771-772). A. The statement that I strongly agree with is “[T]he writer, and not the product, is at the center of communication.” (Collins, 2013). There is a private vision that must be harnessed within our students. It is our obligation to provide the environment for them to discover their truth. It is akin to a transcendental experience that harkens their inner calling where the teacher is merely a guide, advising in our aesthetically appointed expressivist classrooms. As truths morph and emerge so too do
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