Literacy Status In Childhood

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Children are born into families without the choice of their socioeconomic status and with that status comes preconceived ideas about their abilities and future. The unnerving statistics of this, however, is that the status at which a family resides scientifically correlates to the literacy ability and development of the children in the household. “The size of children’s vocabulary at age 3 is strongly associated with reading comprehension at the end of third grade…research also consistently suggests that the size of children’s vocabulary also appears to be correlated with their socioeconomic status” (Vukelich, 2012, p. 100). In general, the lower the socioeconomic status, the lower the child’s literacy abilities, and developmental gains. The…show more content…
Parents in these situations often have trouble financially and sometimes have to work multiple jobs to keep food on the table. Due to this time commitment, there is a lack of literary activities that are executed in the home environment. Not only do these homes often lack activities, but the amount of word usage and verbal as well as written interactions with children are sparse. In the textbook, Vukelich (2012) references a study performed by Teale on low income children which states, “some children had opportunities to experience 25 times the amount of literacy than other children…the average number of minutes per hour that children engaged in literacy activities ranged from 3.6 to 34.72” (p 55). Although there are always outliers, the students from lower-income homes often arrived at school with less experience and exposure to literacy which in turn delayed their literary development and abilities. On the other end of the spectrum, students who are born into higher socioeconomic status homes are more likely to receive exposure to words, print, materials, etc. before beginning their…show more content…
Engaging children in activities such as reading grocery lists, reading labels around the house, or reading a single book per night with their parents can enhance their literary development and outlook on reading. Another idea for educators to integrate into the classroom is the idea of a Classroom Lending Library, which was discussed in the Vukelich text. In layman’s terms, students and parents would abide by a contract that would allow students to take home single books or bundles each night to engage in reading activities with their families (2012, p. 142). Simple activities such as the ones mentioned are not always seen as wonderful learning opportunities, but any exposure and encouragement from parental figures or loved ones allows children to feel more confident in their abilities and generate a more positive outlook on
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