Literary Analysis Of The Grass Is Singing

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The Grass Is Singing by Lessing in the early years of her vocation as an author, is set in South Africa, Rhodesia (New Zimbabwe). This novel is concern with racial discriminations amongst blacks and whites. This work is an attempt to exhibit the life of whites in colonized societies and their superiority to blacks. Like numerous, different works of Lessing which is concern with the postcolonialism, despise the racial humiliation spread in numerous African nations. As told before, the main character is a white who is living among two quiet different societies, consequently, she loses her identity. Mary experiences a new kind of life in a very strange society in another country and among the black Rhodesian. She is a stranger in this society…show more content…
Mary Turner in The Grass Is Singing hates the new circumstance after her marriage when Dick took her to his homestead. She ventures into the life entirely unexpected from anything she had envisioned. She hated the stuffy little house; she detested the locals; and she hated Dick. Such a hint leads the readers to find another aspect of her life which is the feeling of nostalgia for home. She is changed to a stranger for the society; she is white but not behaving like a white. So she is rejected from the white society and not accepted from the black s’. Mary feels alone among the Rhodesians. Consequently she is alone in the exile she made for…show more content…
The story of her breakdown against white standards being from the time she encounters intimate relations with her black native servant, Moses. It is the starting time when Mary’s ambivalent identification with Africanness (her submission to Moses), and with whiteness (her domestic space) could not be resolved and thus led to herself-sacrificial death. She feels a complicated sense of in-between-ness. She does not feel easy in the new place because the nostalgic feelings for the town impressed her mind a lot. She cannot fully identify with England, nor is she comfortable with her British colonial identity as the colonial in exile in Africa. The withe colonizer in this story tried to use English standard as a subject of greater control over the black native. Through their identification with Englishness and England, the
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