Literature Review On Procrastination

1351 Words6 Pages
Firstly, procrastination is investigated and then established in a South African context. Furthermore, psychological distress is broken into anxiety, depression and stress as it seeks to produce results against procrastination. Overall, there is a need to expand the area of not only psychological distress but also, procrastination and social media in the South African context. Research questions 1. What is the relationship between procrastination and social media? 2. Does social media mediate procrastination? 3. Does procrastination lead to bad results and if so, does it produce psychological distress? Literature Review The literature review will provide a well-structured format which will enhance the understanding of procrastination,…show more content…
For the purpose of this study, social media was defined as Facebook or YouTube (Martin, 2008). Although according to a Nielsen Media Research study, providing a detailed perspective on social media use among university students and underscoring that they can produce both positive and negative consequences. Facebook is the most used social network by college students, followed by YouTube and Twitter. The positive aspect of online communities is that youths can utilize them for academic assistance and support (Lusk, 2010). Due to the ability of social media to enhance connections by making them accessible, social media can produce many benefits for the young adults, this includes providing a virtual space for them to explore their interests, hobby’s or problems with similar individuals, academic support, while strengthening online communication skills and knowledge. “Students who may be shy or embarrassed to speak up in class are participating in book discussion and writing for real audiences. There are new Web tools emerging all the time that are enhancing learning (Brydolf,…show more content…
Furthermore, “The relationship between Facebook and well-being appears to become positive over the college years, possibly because upper-class students use Facebook to connect socially with their peers and participate in college life (Kalpidou, Costin, & Morris,
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