Difference Between Error Analysis And Contrastive Analysis

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Register to read the introduction…According to Corder (1971) mistakes are deviation due to performance factors such as memory limitations, spelling pronunciations, fatigue, emotional strain, etc. They are typically random and are readily they can be self-corrected when attention is called. Whereas, an error is the use of linguistic item in that a fluent or native speaker of the language regards it as showing faulty or incomplete learning. In other words, it occurs because the learner does not know what is correct, and thus it cannot be self-corrected. These are systematic and consistent deviances. For the use of distinguishing between an error and mistake, Ellis (1997) suggests two ways. The first one is to check the consistency of learner’s performance. If he sometimes uses the correct form and sometimes the wrong one, it is a mistake. However, if he always uses it incorrectly, it is then an error. The second way is to ask learner to try to correct his own deviant utterance. Where he is unable to, the deviations are errors; where he is successful, they are mistakes. In the light of this information given, errors will be centre stage in the…show more content…
According to Hammer and Rice (1965) contrastive analysis seeks to compare the sounds, grammars and vocabularies of two languages with the aim of describing the similarities and differences between them. Error analysis in language acquisition was established in the 1960s by Stephen Pit Corder as it is mentioned in the beginning. Errors may also be classified according to the level of language: phonological errors, vocabulary or lexical errors, syntactic errors, and so on. Error analysts distinguish between errors, which are systematic, and mistakes, which are not. They often seek to develop a typology of errors. Error can be classified according to basic type: omissive, additive, substitutive or related to word order. They can be classified by how apparent they are; overt errors are obvious even out of context, whereas covert errors are evident only in context. Errors may also be classified according to the level of language: phonological errors, vocabulary or lexical errors, syntactic errors, and so on. In particular, the above typologies are problematic: from linguistic data alone, it is often impossible to reliably determine what kind of error a learner is making. Also, error analysis can deal effectively only with learner production (speaking and writing) and not with learner reception (listening and reading). According to linguist Corder, the following are the steps in any typical EA research; 1) Collecting samples of learner language, 2) Identifying the errors, 3) Describing the errors, 4) Explaining the errors,5) Evaluating/correcting the

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