Lobbyists And Interest Groups

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1 Lobbyists and Interest Groups in Texas 2 A pluralist democracy, defined as a way for individuals to band together to find political strength in numbers, is the basis of political parties and interest groups in the United States. Citizens use both of these types of groups to promote and represent their common political ideas and to achieve goals based on their collective views. Since the early 1800s, Americans have tended to join together in groups to form associations with others who held the same views on a wide variety of topics. Early leaders like James Madison feared that citizens might join together to support issues that were contrary to the public good. Based on review of the Texas Tribune and TRSA Political Action Committee web links, …show more content…

3 Individuals are limited to giving no more than $5,200 to any single candidate within a two year election cycle. Individuals instead have more influence on law-makers with votes. One weakness in relying only on individual voting rights to influence the laws that are passed is that often individual citizens are not well-educated on the consequences of their desire to see certain provisions put into law. From that standpoint, there is definitely a place for interest groups to provide education to lawmakers about both sides of an issue. 4 The TSRA Political Action Committee states on their web site that their purpose is to “educate elected representatives, the media, and the public about issues relating to the freedoms guaranteed by the Second Amendment”. This is beneficial to law-makers as long as the interests of parties for and against an issue are represented by an interest …show more content…

As the laws stand currently, interests groups with lots of money, such as the NRA, have a disproportionate amount of power over smaller groups who are not as well funded. I believe the leniency in the requirements of spending by special interest groups can result in representation of small segments of the population who have money to contribute and can leave out citizens who are unable to give money to opposing groups. In this way, the interest groups have more ability to influence politics than individuals have merely through voting for candidates who most closely mirror their personal values and beliefs. The TRSA Political Action Committee is a perfect example of a large special interest group that actively influences lawmaking. They state many specific gun carry bills and laws on their web site that they lobbied to enact. Specifically, they discuss their influence on implementation of SB11, Personal Protection on College and University Campuses. As a student at a public university, I personally feel very uncomfortable knowing that the person next to me has been given the right to carry a firearm on campus. This does not mean that I don’t agree with the Second Amendment right to bears arms. This is an example of an instance in which an interest group has much more influence than I have as an

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