Logos In The Odyssey Rhetorical Analysis

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Logos Speech Examples 1. “Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love?... These are the implements of war and subjugation” Henry is saying that Great Britain is not trying to peacefully restore relations with the colonies, but instead trying to regain control over them by force. He feels that Great Britain’s deployment of military personal is more of a threat than a means to peacefully win back the colonies’ affection. He appeals to logos here by saying that Britain is sending military units to the colonies only to start a war with them and not resolve tensions. He feels it’s illogical for someone to induce fear…show more content…
“We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts…For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for…show more content…
Henry continues by emotionally describing how he is ready to endure any pain that will come his way from finally learning the truth. He feels he is ready to stand up and be change that must come from the colonies, despite any despair he might face. 2. “There is no retreat but in submission and slavery! Our chains are forged! Their clanking may be heard on the plains of Boston!” Henry appeals to pathos here because he emotionally describes how there is no other choice but to go to war and fight the British. He feels retreating to the British would only result in slavery, and not grant the colonies their freedom. He uses an onomatopoeia to create imagery to the people as if they are locked up, and he lets them know just how great and negative impact a retreat would have on the colonies, thus creating an emotional appeal. Ethos Speech Examples 1. “No man, Mr. President, thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. But different men often see the same subject in different
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