London By William Blake Analysis

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"London", by William Blake uncovers a city overwhelmed by neediness and hardship. Blake overshadows London’s elegant appeal and replaces it with his own twist of the corrupted city. London is nothing more than a city with a shortage of money due to harsh economic times. Those in power have weakened the moral of the while city so that poverty exists in the lower classes. Blake uses three distinct metaphors: “Marriage hearse,” “black’ning Church,” and “mind-forged manacles” to express that the city suffers from social tyranny, physical and psychological confinement, and widespread suffering and despair society. To completely acknowledge “London” the reader must first understand the historical context during this time period. William Blake's…show more content…
The utilization of the words 'wander', 'charter'd' and 'mark' all add to the solemnity climate with the long, drawn out, 'A' sound conjuring up a feeling of torpidity, inciting the pursuer to nearly envision the man's 'cry' of sadness. The first use of charter’d refers to the criticism of the properties around the speaker that are privately owned. The repetition of charter’d then talks about the charter’s Thames, meaning the river Thames, we’re seeing an interesting image of the forcing of human power and control onto something natural like a river. The reader sees a contrast between the power of nature and the power of man. Man seeks to try to charter to control and organize everything, even something as uncontrollable and natural as the river Thames. This second use of the word charter’d can be seen as a satirical attack of the obsession with property rights and as an extension of that human power and control. The irony pointed out by Blake is that a river cannot really be controlled by the passing of a law. One of the courses of suffering is the misuse of power through the charting of each charter’d street and the charted terms. This allowed the rich to become richer and the poor to be more heavily controlled by the government, which widened the gap between the powerless and those in power. Moreover, the repetition of the word, 'mark' is…show more content…
‘In every’ builds up to the final line in the stanza. What the speaker hears in the cries and the voice is the mind forged manacle. Blake is imaging the mind as a forge or a blacksmiths workshop where they would make these manacles. If we were reading this poem at the time it was written this would have been very shocking because readers would have seen manacles on criminals and would have viewed with horror. We see the reference to the chimney sweepers cry, which then ties into every blackening church appalls. I believe this can be read literally, which is the actual blackening with smoke from the chimneys of the industrial revolution. We can read this as a criticism of the industrial revolution as the blackening of the church, the stopping and polluting of what is morally good. On a metaphorical way we can see the blackening church as a criticism through color imagery, black symbolizes evil and therefore it represents bad. The church is an organization which should help the poor is blackened metaphorically with shame. The chimney sweepers crime is bringing shame to the church because they should be helping those in need. The word appall, means to go pale with fear, but the churches are going black with smoke and soot (OD), there is a contradiction of the two opposites together showing how both shouldn’t be able to exist together if there’s poverty in the world, the
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