Loss Of Grief Literary Analysis

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Everyone can experience grief at some point in their life, whether it’s because of the loss of their child, lover, husband, wife or even pet. Relative to grief, J.K. Rowling commented in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, “You care so much you feel as though you will bleed to death with the pain of it” (J.K. Rowling 82). Grief is so painful and enduring that different people will deal with it through unique and individual means. In the book, Hey Nostradamus by Douglas Coupland, the movie Three Colors: Blue by Krzysztof Kieslowski, and the poem Funeral Blues” by W. H. Auden, people suffer from the loss of their beloved ones and they are overwhelmed with grief. The characters in each of these works use various methods such as self-isolation,…show more content…
In Three Colors: Blue, Julie states ,“Sometimes it feels as if everything in life is just something we haul into the grave” (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 21), after she sees the pieces of furniture that her daughter and husband used before. Paralleling Jason’s actions, Julie sells all the furniture. One can only imagine if they did not leave these objects behind, every moment in their life would be full of grief because they would keep on seeing them, which would remind them of their pain. Even after leaving one’s homes and items, contact with others can bring back painful reminders. Old friends, acquaintances, and colleagues can be living reminders of the lost loved one. As soon as one interacts with others, memories of the beloved one can return. In the poem “Funeral Blues”, W. H. Auden writes, ”Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone, Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone” (W. H. Auden, ll. 1-2), emphasizing how ending communication with others can decrease the chance of suffering grief again. As Julie says, “No, I have only one thing left to do... nothing. I don't want any belongings, any memories. No friends, no love. They are all traps” (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 39). Through these three works, it is shown that self-isolation from home, familiar objects, and familiar people can be one of the most effective ways to manage…show more content…
“Her absence is like the sky, spread over everything.” (C. S. Lewis, 59) reveals Jason’s constant grief of losing Cheryl. However this action is meaningless because nothing can really change. Jason realizes the only thing he can do is to accept the truth and learn from this. That is why he writes the letter about the massacre which contains his understanding about love and life after the tragedy. After facing directly with the sorrow, he writes in the letter, “She’s dead and that’s it” (Coupland, 35). Jason’s grief is eased. While Jason’s process of managing grief is built on facing with it and self-reflection, Julie deals with hers by helping accomplish her beloved’s goal. Julie experiences grief after her husband’s death. Her life is meaningless because there are no goals for her to fight for: nothing really matters after the tragedy. However, when she discovers how significant the unfinished piece was to her husband, she decides to help make his last dream come true. Julie states, “This is the last thing I could do for him.” (Krzysztof Kieślowski, 55), and because of this Grief does not seem to be so painful, especially at the moment when the music is created. Julie overcomes her grief by realizing her lover’s goals. Eventually, one has to be aware of the important role they play on others. In both the book and the movie, Jason and Julie coincide to get over grief after the new life comes. Jason has his twins, while Julie finds out that her husband had
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