The Sun Also Rises Analysis

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Regardless of the period of time, there are always recurring societal themes that exist, such as arguments of gender equality, sexuality, and different relationship dynamics. One distinct era that highlights these themes is the Lost Generation. Numerous novels taken from this genre illustrate these continuous social patterns through different settings and characters. Ernest Hemingway and F. Scot Fitzgerald are two Lost Generation authors well-known for their ability to narrate a story that communicates the ups and downs of war, complications of dealing with trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder, and everyday relationships. Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night journey through peoples’ lives while focusing…show more content…
Between The Sun Also Rises and Tender is the Night the emerging role of modern women takes place. While Hemingway and Fitzgerald have different techniques of illustrating their idea of the modern woman, they both successfully depict two women who are not seen as their male counterparts. Brett Ashley from The Sun Also Rises is the first example of a nontraditional woman who lives by her own rules. From the beginning, the reader discovers that Brett Ashley entrances almost every man she meets. From Jake Barnes to Robert Cohn, she has a captivating power that men cannot resist. Despite her numerous relationships, Brett continues to move from one man to the next and does not worry about who she hurts. Throughout the entire story, Brett is engaged but that does not stop her from engaging in other romantic relationships. During a conversation between Jake and Brett, Brett confesses to going on a weekend getaway with Robert Cohn. Brett tells Jake that if Robert Cohn accompanies them to Spain it may be hard on him and when Jake asks why, Brett answers, “Who did you think I went down to San Sebastian with?” (Hemingway 89). This scene exemplifies Hemingway’s concept of the modern woman because he is illustrating that Brett takes charge in her relationships and does what she wants. Rather than write about a man who continuously moves from woman to woman, Hemingway…show more content…
From veterans battling with illnesses and injuries to women striving to break the traditional norms, The Sun Also Rises and Tender is the Night exhibit breakout characters who stray from what it means to be conventional, while living real life scenarios. In addition, methods of how relationships are interpreted and formed also emerge in these stories. While some may enter a relationship to seek comfort in times of tragedy, others break away from a relationship to escape the memory of a difficult time. Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises and F. Scot Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night take storylines and transform them into the opportunity to depict realistic scenarios while using fictional characters. By doing so, readers can relate to characters and discover their own opinions on issues such as gender and
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