Loving V Virginia

1377 Words6 Pages
Imagine meeting that perfect person and falling in love, but because of the person 's skin color, you cannot marry them. This is true for Mildred and Richard Loving. They went to Washington D.C. to get married because they knew it was legal there, and when returning to your home to Virginia they were arrested and put in jail. They were arrested because Richard was caucasian and Mildred was African American. They met when they were young and began a relationship; when Mildred became pregnant at 18, they decided to get married. It was 1958 at that time and illegal for people of different races to marry each other in the state of Virginia. Richard and Mildred pled guilty to violating state law. The judge banished both Richard and Mildred for twenty-five…show more content…
An in an interracial couple, Mildred Jeter a 17-year-old, was black and Richard Loving a 23-year-old, was white. After they got married in Washington D.C and returned in 1958, they were charged and jailed for their actions. The judge told them that they would be sent to prison for one year or they could leave the state for 25 years in exile. Later on, they got arrested for traveling together in Virginia, they were referred to the American Civil Liberties Union. The court ruling disapproved with states banning interracial marriage because it was unconstitutional. In spite of the fact that a privilege to marry is not listed in the Constitution, the Court said that such a privilege is covered under the Fourteenth Amendment in light of the fact that such choices are vital to our survival and our values. Accordingly, they should essentially reside with the individual instead of with the state. This choice is a conflict with the popular argument that something cannot be an actual constitutional right unless it is spelled out straightforwardly in the U.S. Constitution. It additionally stands out amongst the most imperative models on the general thought of common uniformity, clarifying that essential social equality is basic to our reality and cannot really be restricted on the grounds that a few people trust that their god can 't help…show more content…
Historically, injustice has always had eyes for love. Whether it’s the Supreme court cases of 1967 Loving v. Virginia on interracial marriage, injustice has stared love in the face with eyes wide open: refusing it, hating it, judging it, even making the formal union of that love, marriage illegal. Justice has never been blind, and the law has always been behind the humanity of the people it 's supposed to serve. Before this turning point decision made history and headlines, there was just love. In an interview with ABC, News Mildred said: “I didn’t realize how bad it was until we got married.” So terrible that the police attacked the Lovings home in the middle of the night on an unknown tip. Because of Virginia 's 400-year-old antimiscegenation law, the couple was accused of a lawful offense and was sentenced to one to five years in jail. In spite of the fact that Mildred and Richard reached a plea bargain, they were requested to leave Virginia and could not come back to Virginia together for twenty-five years. They moved to Washington D.C., where they lived in a poor neighborhood, despite their banishment in Virginia, they secretly visited Virginia together. The defining moment was the point at which one of Mildred and Richard 's children was hit by a drunk driver. During the 1960s white racists targeted African Americans, this way bad timing for Mildred. Mildred Loving watched a cross being burned on her mom 's yard as the Loving case moved gradually through the court
Open Document