Lucretia Mott: A 19th Century Hero

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What comes to mind when you hear the name, Lucretia Mott? Most people would wonder how to pronounce her name, however, I think of her as a 19th-century hero. Lucretia Mott was never confined by society 's norms. She constantly dared to challenge and change the world around her through her endless amounts of activism. Throughout her 87 years of life, her true and final goal was equality for all. When Lucretia was born in 1793, the United States was highly segregated. Luckily, Lucretia, unlike most, was born into a progressive religion, known as the Quakers. They believed in social and economic equality. However, Lucretia at a young age noticed that even in a so-called equal society there was a pay gap between women and men teachers at the Quaker school she attended. This revelation started her journey for equality. Even after learning that her religion was not as equal, Lucretia was still very involved with the Quaker community. In 1818 after Lucretia finished her schooling, she became a minister. This gave Lucretia a monumental platform for shared her views. While doing these speeches, she also made many powerful connections with people and organizations who shared similar views.

At the young age of 18, Lucretia got married to James
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After years of preaching, Lucretia’s focus turned from being a Quaker minister to being an abolitionist activist. “In 1833, Mott, along with Mary Ann M’Clintock and nearly 30 other female abolitionists, organized the Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society.” (NPS Lucretia Mott nps.gov). The Philadelphia Females Anti- Slavery Society quickly became a significant group composed of white and black women who were progressive thinkers. Outside of their meetings, in which everyone was treated equally, there would often be mobs protesting. However, those actions did not hinder their activism. The Philadelphia Females Anti-Slavery Society continued until 1870 when the 14th and 15th amendments were made to the

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