Macbeth: Aristotle's Description Of A Tragic Hero

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Aristotle’s version of a tragic hero is a person who makes judgement mistakes which causes his or her own downfall. In the play Macbeth written by Shakespeare, the main character Macbeth is an example of Aristotle’s description of a tragic hero. Macbeth fits the definition of an Aristotelian tragic hero by his nobility turning into excessive pride due to his felonious actions, but after his fall from grace he becomes conscious of his lost virtue and he begins to regain his integrity. Macbeth originally appears as a noble and valiant war hero in the beginning of the play. Macbeth was portrayed as an extremely loyal and brave soldier who would risk his life for King Duncan at first. Initially, he did not have the idea to become king in his head,…show more content…
The main reason for Macbeth’s fall from grace was caused by himself. He became extremely greedy and self-indulgent when the witches revealed their prophecies to him. He once was a noble and respectful man, but when he was introduced to the evil witches he instantly became a whole new person and forgot how much of a respected person he was. He began to murder anyone who was doubtful or a threat to him. His judgement was completely impaired by the fascination of being king. Not only did he crave the power, he became obsessed with the thought of having the throne. Macbeth had a major impact on his own downfall in his…show more content…
In the play Macbeth, Macbeth is a perfect version of an Aristotelian tragic hero due to his change in nobility, ignorance, and poor judgement. Macbeth fits the definition of an Aristotelian tragic hero by his nobility turning into excessive pride due to his felonious actions, but after his fall from grace he becomes conscious of his lost virtue and he begins to regain his
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