Mahatma Gandhi's Idea Of Spiritual Politics

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Mahatma Gandhi is one of the great figures of the twentieth century. In a century marked by the excesses of Nazism and Communism, the struggles against Colonialism, and two World Wars, his theory and practice of nonviolence shined like a beacon of hope. He tried to create a religiously tolerant and inclusive civic nation in his own country, divided as it was along religious, linguistic and ethnic lines. How to live in peace, justice and prosperity in today’s pluralistic societies is a lesson that he never tired of teaching, and from which people everywhere can learn. When Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated on January 30, 1948, the world hailed him as one of the greatest spiritual leaders, not just of the century, but of all time. He was ranked…show more content…
(There are probably thousands of letters scattered around the world still to be added.) Gandhi’s writings comprise one of the largest collections by a spiritual and political figure ever gathered. 3. Objectives This paper deals with Mahatma Gandhi’s idea of spiritual politics. It deals with the basic essence of his idea and its application in the modern world .The main objectives of the paper are as follows: • To bring to light the impact of the idea preached by Mahatma Gandhi in modern times. • To discuss the idea of Gandhi on spiritualisation of politics and non violence as the major weapon in fighting all the odds of the society and his contribution in the spiritualisation of politics. 4. Methodology The method of research adopted is secondary in nature. Sources referred are mostly from the internet as well as books written by Mahatma Gandhi and other eminent writers. Books & other…show more content…
Gandhi insisted that these issues are a matter of life and death and they are spiritual questions, and that peace and justice requires lifelong dedication and willingness to suffer and die. This is not a new teaching. Jesus commanded his followers to take up the cross. Early Christians wrote that the way to the reign of God lay in our participation of the Paschal Mystery, the cross and resurrection. Gandhi translated the cross to mean an active willingness to be arrested, tried, imprisoned and killed for the cause of justice and peace. “Freedom is to be wooed only inside prison walls and sometimes on the gallows,” he declared, “but never in council chambers, courts, or the schoolroom.” Gandhi’s path to political transformation is fundamentally rooted in the spiritual requirement of risk, renunciation, sacrifice, even
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