Malcolm's Motivation In Macbeth

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A man`s ambition and desire influences his decisions in life. This is seen when Malcolm’s motivation in the play Macbeth by Shakespeare is his desire to be crowned king to get back his father’s throne. Throughout the play, it is seen that most of Malcolm’s decisions such as to escape Scotland, build an army, and gain support of others, are those that ensure that his family will get the throne back. Malcolm’s motivation is displayed when he builds an army against Macbeth. Once he goes to England, the “gracious England hath/ [l]ent [Malcolm] good Siward and ten thousand men” (IV. iii. 219-220) for Malcolm to fight Macbeth for the crown. It is seen in this scene, that his will to become king is so strong, that it is filling him with such…show more content…
The motivation for Malcolm to become king is proven when he leaves to save his life and gain the support of the king of England, which will bring him closer to overthrowing Macbeth, and gaining the throne. Likewise, Malcolm`s ambition to become king is seen when he convinces Macduff to get revenge in Macbeth for killing his family. Malcolm is so overcome by his desire and goal, that he encourages Macduff to take ``great revenge/ [and t]o cure the deadly grief`(4.iii.253-254) of losing his family. One can clearly interpret that although Macbeth and Macduff are just recently informed of the killing of Macduff`s family, Malcolm is once again filled with motivation to overthrow Macbeth, instead of grieve for theA man`s ambition and desire influence his decisions in life. This is seen when Malcolm’s motivation in the play Macbeth by Shakespeare is his desire to be crowned king to get back his father’s throne. Throughout the play, it is seen that majority of Malcolm’s decisions such as to escape Scotland, build an army, and gain support of others, are those that ensure that his family will get the throne back. Malcolm’s motivation is displayed when he builds an army against Macbeth. Once he goes to England, the “gracious England hath/ [l]ent [Malcolm] good Siward and ten thousand
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