Malcom X

1545 Words7 Pages
Spanning the entirety of the world, individuals find causes that they have such an investment in, they find it necessary to take a public stance in order to spread awareness for the cause. In the dynamics of society today, it is not unheard of, or even uncommon, for individuals to encounter advocates in every aspect of life. It seems as though society has become immune to the amount of activism and sponsorship seen on television, in the media, as well as on a personal encountering basis. Advocates have the ability to campaign for a multitude of behaviors, such as the conversion of others to join one’s religious community. It is understood that many individuals simply ignore the advocacy others present, and many times are not interested in transforming…show more content…
As a Muslim figurehead, Malcom was constantly in the spotlight as directed on him by the Nation of Islam. Thus, Malcom continued to live a life that encompassed frequent travel, multitudes of speaking engagements and constant advocacy for the nation in their fight for human rights. Malcom’s charm and magnetism, in combination with his drive and conviction for the Muslim community was noticed by all, and he attracted a large increase in Muslim followers. From the time of his conversion on, Malcom X lived a life entirely dedicated to the Islamic faith and community. In the afternoon of February 21st, 1965 Malcom began to address his audience at a rally in the Audubon Ballroom. His last words of advocacy for the Islamic world and human rights were spoken that day as Malcom X was then shot several times and successfully assassinated. Malcom X died while doing his life’s work; he died speaking publicly for the Muslim community. It cannot be denied that Malcom X played an active role in advocating for many of his beliefs, one of which being his strong Islamic…show more content…
Upon this finding, Willow almost explodes with frustration in seeing that such an educated woman still believes that Egyptian Muslims would kill an innocent baby. Willow adds that after reading the article “[she] said the worst thing you can say… I called her an Orientalist” (276). Willow continues to add that “it was a gross overreaction, and a very stupid one: I was white, she was Arab…” (276). Willow is aware and conscious of that fact that even though her statement is nothing but technically true, that the woman was being racist, Willow is unable to speak out in such a manner. Her use of the word “Orientalist” implies white superiority, and despite the fact that Willow is a Muslim herself, she cannot air her opinions as she did because in fear of others perceiving that as truth to the stereotypes of Muslims, while hurting her goal of transforming the public’s view of
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