Malthus's Theory On Population Theory

939 Words4 Pages
1.Introduction 1.1. Background Malthus is known as a pessimistic classical economist. By making this definition, the predictions of the population theory are influential. He theorizes that the increase in food supply is not enough for the growing population, that must be stopped or else poverty is inevitable. Along with this pessimism, other classics see population theory as one of the cornerstones of classical economics. It is not possible to justify Malthus's concern about the future prospect of scarcity. When it is though that agriculture was made under extensional conditions during the Malthus's period and that the need food was only provided by the soil. However, the great industrial revolution and subsequent developments in the later…show more content…
Method In order to achieve my aim, I will examine different approaches and criticisms made about the Malthus's theory and how the theory is applied. I will apply the theoretical notions such as production set in production theory and marginal diminishing return. I will perform to theoretical notions and go into the place of Malthus's theory. 1.4. Literature Survey By this time, the subject that I have chosen has been researched by various experts, authors etc., that is why there are lots of different articles that I have faced while doing my research. While there is some research on this topic which analyzes the topic extensively, there are the ones whose subtitles include the specific information that I am looking for. I have preferred to look at some of them. Here, I have the conclusion of example material. The Malthusian doctrine can be accepted as a special case of the Law of Diminishing Returns, the effects on stabilizing in developed countries by changes in technology and other variables. Despite these defaults, we can pass by some elements of truth found in the Malthusian Theory. Essentially, this theory has not lost all its effectiveness nowadays. However, Malthus's lessons cannot be ignored to associate with the demands of the society from the end sources. The law of marginal diminishing returns cannot be lifted, only offset. A substantial part of my literature is Varian 2010 which is the course…show more content…
Century. During the Malthus period, mass production increased due to the influence of industrialization so the demand for labor decreased and wages fell. There was a large population increase in the UK. Industrialists were employing women and children in heavy works, but still many adults were unemployed. The purpose of doing this was to reduce the unit cost. Malthus proposed a theory in his first work called ‘'An Essay on the Principles of the Population.'' There was a very pessimistic picture about population growth in that case and he said that ‘'It is a shame to believe that population will grow endlessly without encountering any obstacles''. According to this theory, the population increases in the form of geometric series of 1,2,4,6,8,16,32… as foods increases 1,2,3,4,5,6… in the form of arithmetic series. Malthus said that the rate of population growth was much higher than the increase in food capacity needed for human nutrition, which inevitably creates a crisis. Malthus, who exemplifies the population growth in the United States, in particular, has suggested that if the population is released, the population will increase one time every twenty-five years. According to this, the balance between the population and the foodstuffs is deteriorating and the difference between population growth and sources must be
Open Document