Mango Tree In The Philippines

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ANG PANDANANON SA PAGTUBANG SANG MGA KALAT-AN: HISTORY OF DISASTERS AND DISASTER MANAGEMENT OF THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT UNIT OF PANDAN, ANTIQUE
There is a story in Philippine folklore about a mango tree and a banana tree arguing who is the strongest. The bamboo sits silent through the conversation. There is then a tremendous amount of rain that pours from the skies on the trees. Each remains unaffected though and the argument between the banana tree and the mango tree continues, each claiming their strength. A heat wave then overcomes the trees. They all wither slightly but emerge healthy and again the debate over strength continues. The bamboo tree again remains silent. Then a great typhoon comes. The wind blows on the mango and banana trees, stretching them to their limits, when finally they snap and are uprooted. The wind blows on the bamboo as well, bending it much further than the mango or banana trees, but it doesn’t break. The storm passes and the bamboo is the only one left standing. The Filipino has always been likened to the bamboo. He can ride nature’s lashes and stand straight when the worst is over.
The Philippines is no stranger to natural disasters, from typhoons to tsunamis to volcanic eruptions to earthquakes – name it, the
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The official name of the present municipality of Pandan was adopted in the year 1654 from the Spanish noun “dan” meaning bread, and from the demonstrative pronoun in the Visayan “dan” which in Spanish signifies “Ese” meaning “that”. Pandan has two types of climate, the dry season and the wet season. The dry months starts from December and wind up in May. June to September is the rainiest months, with an average of 24 rainy days. The average annual rainfall is 10.27 inches with the greatest precipitation occurring from June to September. Typhoons and floods occur during the coldest month of the year with an average of

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