Manipulation In Gone Girl

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The decision to read any book usually starts by a recommendation from another person; someone who has read and been affected by a book in some way or another. My inspiration came as a suggestion from one individual as a personal favorite and I, with only a vague understanding of the plot, took their advice. All I knew is it was a book where a husband’s wife goes missing. The basis of the story has been the outline for another novel I have already read and that book had been interesting, so I thought there was no harm in reading another. David Fincher, the director of the film Gone Girl, cleverly portrays the dark, suspenseful mood that brilliantly contributed to capturing the theme of manipulation found throughout Gillian Flynn’s novel…show more content…
Uniquely, however, the novel and film adaption both effectively portray the manipulation, but in their own way. The novel creates the manipulation through the dialogue, which compared to the movie, is much more subtle. This is because Flynn must use many words to describe what is happening and she uses a lot of the text explaining things that are going on in the characters’ brains. “Nick loved me. A six-o kind of love: he loooooove me. But he didn’t love me, me. Nick loved a girl who didn’t exist. I was pretending the way I often did, pretending to have a personality. I can’t help it, it’s what I’ve always done: The way some people change fashion regularly, I change…show more content…
Creatively, though, Fincher continues the manipulation into his own expression of this exact scene. Very to the point, “I hope you liked Diary Amy. She was meant to be likable. Meant for someone like you to like her.” Fincher’s deliverance of manipulation throughout the whole film gives the same message as the book in a new way. He has taken the manipulation and succeeded in using it to its greatest possible effect. This instance is no exception. By directing Amy’s words to the audience this moment that makes the story come to life. Amy has manipulated the viewer, a fiction character verbally recognizes a real person, taking a step through the fourth wall and explaining the experience exactly as she wanted the viewer to feel. At the very moment, the film is a trap created by Fincher to show the power of manipulation. The visual effects and ability to play with the sense of sight where the basis of truth for many people lies, creates a more profound impact that words alone cannot create. The power of manipulation is contagious throughout the story and Amy is not the only culprit. The movie quote from this scene is essentially what happens in the book, surprisingly though the movie creates more of a deal out of this moment than the book. The book uses a summary in Nick’s own mind, while the movie gives some dialogue to the moment. Nick used the manipulation of what he knew his
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