Manipulation In Julius Caesar Essay

900 Words4 Pages
Manipulation in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar Manipulation can be defined as a way of tricking someone into believing or doing something another individual wants them to do. Manipulation is often shown throughout The Tragedy of Julius Caesar by William Shakespeare. Shakespeare includes this aspect in order to highlight key events and characters in the play. It can be assumed that without manipulation, Julius Caesar may have not been assassinated on the Ides of March. However, this is not the case. Manipulation is a very important part of this tragedy, that is displayed in many different situations, and controls the outcome of multiple events. Julius Caesar states, “I could be well moved if I were as you. / If I could pray to move, prayers…show more content…
Soothsayer warns, “Beware the Ides of March” (I.ii.20). Therefore warning Caesar, and letting the audience know that Caesar will die on the Ides of March. However, this is not the only sign that Caesar faces. Calpurnia has a vision of a statue of Caesar spewing blood which leads her to remind him not to go to the senate. Yet, Caesar is extremely arrogant and overlooked the warnings that could have saved his life. In this instance, Caesar could have been manipulated in a positive way, where he wouldn’t have been assassinated by members of the senate. Nonetheless, Caesar is killed and this has an extreme effect on one of his adherents, Marc…show more content…
He believes this because he was persuaded into participating in the assassination against Caesar only for the good of Rome. A way of tricking someone into believing or doing something another individual wants them to do can be defined as Manipulation. Manipulation is used and experienced by Cassius, Brutus, and Antony throughout this play. Nonetheless, manipulation appears in events that would not have been the same without it. Manipulation can be either positive or negative, and plays a key role in the way many situations turn out, not only in The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, but in other plays or books, and in real
Open Document