March On Washington Impact

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In 1963, the admirable March on Washington was an important catalyst aiding in the signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Interestingly enough, African-Americans were not the only people who cared about civil rights, but whites as well, hence the 75,000 whites that took a stance at the March on Washington. The March on Washington tested the dedication of many people around the world as they traveled to the Lincoln Memorial in hope of finalizing the discrimination and segregation of African-Americans. The March on Washington, a non-violent protest against segregation, aided in the signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which made African American lives more fair and respected. Along with other movements, the March on Washington was one…show more content…
In 1963, the March on Washington became the largest display of civil rights activists the country had ever seen (“The March” 1). The March was one of the most notable and respected Civil Rights Movements in the country. Even today, the March on Washington affects us, we even have a day for the man who made this all possible, Martin Luther King Jr., the author of the famous speech, ‘I have a dream’. ‘I have a dream’ was the main speech on August 28, 1963, Martin Luther King Jr. had spoke in front of the Lincoln Memorial where the March had taken place. King’s speech had a very positive effect for African-Americans (“Baughman” 2) since it had emphasised how horrible African-Americans had it, even after the Emancipation Proclamation. Even though the March on Washington did not end segregation and discrimination itself, it had pushed for the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to be signed, thus giving the marchers a sense of self accomplishment. The March on Washington had not made an impact on the civil-rights bill; however it had made an impact on the nation and on the world (“Siebold” 4). In opposition, there were some negative effects that were apparent after the March on…show more content…
Even after the March on Washington, racial discrimination was still present (“March”3). Many people were against the March and wanted to kill as many African-Americans as they could before the March on Washington. Prior to the March, ticking bombs were discovered at a Black Church in Birmingham (“Partridge” 37). Even after the March, discrimination and segregation still took place towards African-Americans. The hopeful Marchers had to wait until the signing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 for any real change to occur. The March on Washington had been much anticipated to turn violent, therefore, hospitals and police were notified and hired to be ready for the worst. Hospitals were ready for trauma accidents while police were ready to break up any dispute that might arise. All in all, there were not many negative effects of the March on
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