Maritime Trade Case Study

1609 Words7 Pages
1. INTRODUCTION: The paper evaluates the Global textile trade flow in the context of an accepted Analytical Model (Figure 1). This Analytical Model has three major components. The first component of concentric circles depicts the textile trade flow and shows evolution of maritime trade in the overall Textile supply chain. The second component of the model outlines major factors that can have direct and indirect impact on global supply chain pattern. These major factors are technology, climate, legislations and the economy itself. In Section 1, authors firstly examine the current global textile trading pattern (first component of model) in the light leading influential factors (second component of model). Then the authors briefly comment on…show more content…
As it can be seen that major trade flow is intercontinental (Asia to Europe & America), so the maritime trade becomes an integral part of the overall supply chain. The clothing/apparel travels across ocean in Containers. Container ships became obvious choice for transportation because of the following advantages over bulk/general cargo shipping; 1) Protection of cargo against humidity, dust and heat exposure. It is prime requirement of clothing cargo because it is primarily made of cotton and can degraded in humidity and dust. 2) Being carried in container the intermodal transport becomes fast and make possible the “floor to door” delivery concept. This reduces transport handling time and hence increases responsiveness. High responsiveness is one of key requirement of clothing supply chain because of fast changing fashion taste of consumers. The clothing/apparel is transported through containers in two…show more content…
This team consults and develops a close working relationship to serve global supply chain needs. Once the service contract is signed, this team implements the next phase including expediting the pick-up and delivery of cargo, proactively communicating cargo status and resolving cargo issues, as well as acting on shipper’s behalf to leverage the Liner organization to shipper’s benefit. Section 2.2 further elaborates the above and other involved support activities. 2. How the Maritime Logistic Organized: 2.1. Global Supply Chain of Textile Supply Chain The Logistic Chain for Clothes, from the beginning until they end up at the consumers, contains four basic stages. From the fibers production to textiles and then from the production of the final product (clothes) to retailers and finally, consumers. Each stage contains a lot of players and has a very wide geographical spread, but it is crucial because it adds value to the final product (Verma,
Open Document