Marriage And Marriage In Jane Austen's Pride And Prejudice

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Jane Austen is renowned for her use of irony, which may be simply defined as, and allowing the intelligent reader to understand the underlying meaning by the way in which the apparent meaning is expressed. Socially controlled thoughts of suitable conduct for every sexual orientation considered into Austen's work too. While social progression for young fellows lay in the military, church, or law, the central strategy for self-change for ladies was the procurement of riches. Ladies could just achieve this objective through effective marriage, which clarifies the universality of marriage as an objective and subject of discussion in Austen's composition. In spite of the fact that young ladies of Austen's day had more flexibility to pick their spouses…show more content…
Hence their marriages are based on their economic needs and or lust. They believe their economic needs/lust are a better reason for marrying than love. Romantic love is a special right that most people never earn, and in this novel very few characters love purely. Marriage was not about love it was about forming unions between families and moving up in the world, hence women were expected to get married. Pride and Prejudice contends against the judgement of love at first sight, but proposes that the better and far more acceptable kind of love grows…show more content…
Because Mrs Bennet knew that Mr Bingly was rich he wanted him to be his son in-law at first sight. This would help them boast their social status in the area and secure their land after Mr Bennet has passed on. Furthermore, Lizzy and Darcy at first had no social relationship and as stated above they literally hated each other. Both of them had pride and they had a specific prejudice about one another. When getting to know each other they saw that all of their doings toward each other were wrong hence they first formed a social relationship, there after they had a love relationship which resulted in
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