Marriage Market Model Case Study

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Marriage Market Model Classical economic models treats partner-choosing process as markets where individuals select the best possible mate considering their own preferences and opportunities in the market (Becker 1991; Iyigun and Walsh 2007; Lundberg and Pollak 1993). Goode (1964) and Elder (1969) suggest that people tends to find partner with the possible greatest socioeconomic status or the best prospective future earning. Some recent studies also outline the importance of other factors such as life styles, attitudes towards gender and even tastes (Kalmijn 1998; Pollak and Watkins 1993). ‘When each individual makes the best match, efficient status matching (or homogamy) occurs.’ (Lui 2016). Becker, Gary S. 1991. A Treatise on the Family.…show more content…
This means that mating with the consideration of the social status consists of a series of social and economic human capital measurements, such as education and occupation with respect of honor and esteem received. Some previous studies show that there is a positive correlation between individuals’ education level and occupation. In other words, education level can be an important predictor of occupation status. From the human capital perspective, we may argue that the reason behind the general consideration of educational attainment in marriage market is because education can be related to future earnings and socioeconomic security. Individuals tend to find partners with higher education levels as they may provide better than others with lower education levels. This might be an explanation of years of schooling often being listed as one of the criteria for mate selection among the Chinese (Honig & Hershatter 1988; Whyte & Parish 1984). Also, as explained in Becker’s status exchange model, women tends to find partners who are good providers, while men prefer young, domestic, and/or beautiful women—more so in some societies than others (Becker 1991; Fisman et al.…show more content…
It disrupted the traditional arranged marriage by parents and legalised free-choice marriage (Yang 1959). It seemed that individuals could be freer to choose partners based on romantic feelings and replaced the social status based mate matching with free love matching. However, in reality, status matching instead of love matching remained dominant after 1950 (Croll 1984; Whyte and Parish 1984). Individuals preferred to use their freedom to choose partners based on materialist considerations, such as education. It also maintained traditional social status matching convention, “matching doors and windows”, but changed the selection base from family freedom to personal freedom (Song
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