Martin Gansberg's 37 Who Saw Murder Didn T Call Police

902 Words4 Pages
One call could have saved a life Screaming to the top of her lungs, crying in pain, and for help was not enough for bystanders around to call attention to. Bystanders, make a difference in any situation and can help to potentially save a life. Screaming in the middle is not something normal that is heard. In “37 Who Saw Murder Didn’t Call Police” written by Martin Gansberg, the author focused on the death of Kitty Genovese that could have been avoided. The author believes that bystander’s actions were significant because when someone is screaming the first instinct should be to call attention to it, the right thing to do is help, it could have saved Kitty Genovese’s life. Martin Gansberg believes that the bystander’s actions were significant because when someone is hollering for help the first instinct should be to signal attention to it. In the middle of the night, hardly a sign of human interaction, there were various shouts heard. Kitty Genovese was living a horror episode and not one individual was considerate enough to help. A “first instinct” is a natural response to an action or event. “One witness called after the woman was dead” (Gansberg). This witness, obviously did not follow their first instinct because they decided to call attention to the situation after the fatality happened. An action like this can be named…show more content…
Written by Martin Gansberg, the article “37 Who Saw Murder Didn’t Call Police”, he communicates that bystander’s actions were significant because when someone is screaming the first instinct should be to call attention to it, the right thing to do is help, and it could have saved Genovese’s life. Bystander’s actions can go a long way, saving a life for example. When this story is told, it is often hard for many to believe, but it happened. Just with the simple action of picking up the phone, it could have stopped Kitty Genovese’s unjust
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