Martin Luther King Racial Injustice Essay

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Many may question the idea that a law is unjust if it is inflicted on a mass population who had no part in enacting and devising the law. In the United States, citizens would consider that predicament as a violation of democracy. However, many minorities, particular black American were inflicted by laws that were passed without a fair consensus due to simulations that limited their rights as American citizens. As a result, many black Americans risk their lives fighting for justice for the black community. Although it is one’s moral obligation to abide by the laws for the sake of humanity and harmony amongst the nation, it is unconstitutional to not hold all accountable to the same standards of this nation’s constitution. Therefore, breaking…show more content…
During the duration of his time at a Birmingham jail, Dr. King strategically enlightened his fellow clergymen of the qualities that make a situation unjust. He states that “in any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: collection of the facts to determine whether injustice exist; negotiation; self-purification; and direct action.” Using these four steps, he provides a clear outline to prove that there is a plague of racial injustice in the city of Birmingham. Because of the racial injustice inflicted upon the black community, Dr. King, being an unshakable figurehead, takes it upon himself to provoke direct action to bring a resolution to these problems. Dr. King believed to create effect change, “we must meet the needs for nonviolent gadflies to create the kind of tension in society that will help men rise from the dark depths of prejudice and racism.” Though we must not enforce social change of unjust laws by breaking just laws, the black community must act as agitators for justice. Though the power of one dominant leader can be the pioneer for change, it takes masses to provoke thought of what is morally right and wrong. Dr.King assertively confronts community clergyman to question their ideologies of what is and is not morally
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