An Analysis Of Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication Of The Rights Of Women

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Register to read the introduction…She was a feminist, at her time the word “feminist” had not been created, she was called a lot of things - an "able advocate" for her gender, a "hyena in petticoats," the bearer of a "rigid, and somewhat Amazonian temper." Today we know her as a person who fought for woman rights. Not everyone was positive about her ideas, but she never gave up. Mary Wollstonecraft was an educator and one of the first woman rights activist, who changed the way how woman were viewed by themselves and…show more content…
Since she was small she had seen how women had been treated and she had to do something about it. Her most known work is A Vindication of The Rights of Woman which was published in 1792. . She had argued that a woman must be intelligent in her own right, she argued. She cannot assume that her husband will be intelligent! A quote from her book is “Women are told from their infancy, and taught by the example of their mothers, that a little knowledge of human weakness, justly termed cunning, softness of temper, outward obedience, and a scrupulous attention to a puerile kind of propriety, will obtain for them the protection of man; and should they be beautiful, everything else is needless, for at least twenty years of their lives." She said that an educational system where girls could be educated just like boys would result in women being wives, mothers but also workers in many professions Other early feminist had tried to change that, but Wollstonecraft’s work was unique, she had said that women’s status would be affected through political change. A change like this would benefit everyone. Wollstonecraft’s work A Vindication of The Rights of Woman had failed to bring up any immediate reforms. However, in the 1840s American and English women’s movements adapted some of the principles in her
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