What Are Maslow's Hierarchy Of Needs

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Psychology – Outcome 2 Within this essay I have chosen to discuss Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs and the Conditioning Theories of Pavlov and Skinner. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs exist with the purpose of moulding an individual into the person they will later become. It consists of 8 needs (4 deficiency needs and 4 growth needs). The 4 Deficiency needs consist of: Physiological needs (food, drink and warmth), Safety needs (security, freedom from fear and stability), Love/Belonging needs (friendship, intimacy, trust and love), Self-Esteem needs (self-respect, peer respect and independence). The Growth needs consist of: Cognitive needs (knowledge, understanding, and meaning), Aesthetic needs (appreciation, beauty and symmetry), Self-Actualisation…show more content…
In order for an individual to achieve all 8 needs they must complete the need which has come before it. Thus, if a person’s physiological needs are not met efficiently (ie. food, drink, warmth, sleep) they will not be able to meet the needs which follow appropriately. Safety needs follow physiological needs and if these are not met to their maximum potential an individual may struggle to achieve stability or secure a job and so on. As we move up the hierarchy there are needs such as Self-esteem and Aesthetic. If these fail to be met, it may lead an individual to have low self-esteem and/or self-worth and could lead to difficulty seeing the beauty and symmetry of one’s self. (Collin, n.d., P138,139) This theory applies to my patient as they were homeless living in a hostel. They grew up in a deprived area and from a young age their physiological needs were not met. As a result, they struggled to then find a job, a home and did not keep them self in good health. Each of these also lead to their dependency on alcohol and linked to their alcohol related behaviour. The patient was verbally aggressive and had many outbursts which lead to multiple security alerts. As their cognitive needs…show more content…
These theories provide an insight into the lives and minds of many patients I see on a daily basis. They aid the skills we need in order to provide efficient and holistic care for patients. Having a knowledge of why a patient may act a certain way or feel a certain way makes it easier to empathise and develop a stronger relationship with patients. The in depth knowledge of these psychological theories strengthens the therapeutic relationship. The therapeutic relationship is a bond between nurse and patient. This relationship is essential as it ensures patients receive the best care possible. In having this relationship we have a responsibility not only to care for and respect a patient’s physical needs but also their emotional and mental needs. We must encourage their faith and ensure the relationship is based on mutual trust and respect. This relationship must have boundaries and be kept strictly professional at all times regardless of the situation. (Richard,
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