Mass Media In North Korea

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1) MASS MEDIA ACCESS IN NORTH KOREA

The Mass Media are often described as ‘a double-edged sword’ for society: they contribute to democracy-building but they can also become mouthpieces and propaganda instruments in many authoritarian regimes. North Korea, known officially as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is ruled by one of the world's most repressive regimes, where the Korean Worker Party is in charge of defining what subjects are to be covered by the Media and refuses to open the country up to the Internet.

c) INTERNET

Since the mid-1990s, the DPRK government has built a domestic intranet and some propaganda web sites (such as Chosǒn Tongshin known as Korean News Service) that showcase the country's politics, economy, culture,
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For that reason, some North Koreans purchase a second radio set that is not registered, enabling them to listen to foreign broadcasts.

2) PRESS LAWS IN NORTH KOREA

a) PRESS AS A SOCIOPOLITICAL INSTITUTION
The North Korean press is 'completely controlled' by the authorities (Cumings) and even in the official press there is not a single item relating to any form of resistance to authority except for so-called economic crimes and, of course, allegations of spying and treason.
Moreover, in a number of his speeches the late North Korean president Kim II Sung describes the press as an 'agitator, propagandist, and organizer to help the government to rule’.
In every respect, the North Korean press is no more than 'a forced slave' of its government and is perceived as an instrument of the ruling authorities to advance its socialist goals and for guiding opinion in a direction' conforming to their totalitarian ideology.

b) NORTH KOREAN CONSTITUTION AND THE PRESS

The North Korean Constitution and the Press seem to have a symbiotic relationship, considering that there is no room for conflict between the North Korean press and law enforcement
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However, in reality and in the name of 'collective good' as defined by President Kim II Sung and his political party, the basic right to a free press is denied to North Koreans.
In other words, freedom of the press in North Korea is freedom within the supreme State to pursue the set goals of the state. Consequently, there is no 'freedom from government' as far as the North Korean press is concerned. Thus, North Korea has no need for separate direct press legislation because as a state institution, the press is absolutely controlled by
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