Mathematics In Real Life

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Mathematics is the knowledge that deals with the logic of shape, quantity and arrangement. It is what we do in our everyday live which includes mobile devices, art, money, engineering, and even sports. In other words, we can say that we cannot deal with the world without mathematics because what we do in real lives involves the using of calculations and even using of numbers. Maths helps us to count; it also helps us to measure things, and so on. Since the beginning of recorded history, mathematic discovery has been at the forefront of every civilized society, and in use in even the most primitive of cultures. The needs of math arose based on the wants of society. The more complex a society, the more complex the mathematical needs. Primitive…show more content…
It is written in mathematical language, and the letters are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without which means it is humanly impossible to comprehend a single word. Without these, one is wandering about in the wilderness. Albert Einstein (1879–1955) stated that "as far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain; and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality." These mathematicians discover about algebras, geometries, calculus, number patterns, and many others including word problems. For the past few years researchers have found out that most primary school students prefer doing mathematical notation rather than word problems. Word problem is any mathematical exercise where significant background information on the problem is presented as text rather than in mathematical notation. In math, a problem is presented as text, usually in scenario (narrative or story) with varying number of sentences. For example, “A salesman sold twice as much pear in the afternoon than in the…show more content…
It is certain that they have their place. But those simple routine problems will cause students to learn this unspoken "rules, i.e. "Word problems found in math books are solved by some routine or rule that you find in the beginning of that particular lesson." Yet another difficulty is that students tend to think linearly, step-by-step, and try make the numbers and the text match in the same order. For example, Jane had 25 pens and she gave away 15. How many does she have now? Answer: 25 − 15. Then if the word problem doesn't follow a step-by-step recipe, they are lost. For example: "After giving away some cards, Jane now has 17 cards left of her original 30. How many cards did she give away?" This time, none of these calculations gives you the answer: 17 − 30, 17 + 30, or 17 ×
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