Max Weber Social Action Examples

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Weber 1) Max Weber’s sociological theories revolved around social action. The two most prominent forms of social action being rational action and non-rational action. Both terms seem self explanatory. Rational action is seen in behaviors that are motivated by a analytical or reasoned evaluation of an individual, group, or organizations goals and how they pursue them. Non-rational action is when behavior is motivated by either emotions or traditions instead of thoughtful reasoning. The two articles, “So Eager for Grandchildren, They’re Paying the Egg-Freezing Clinic” and “In Choosing a Sperm Donor, a Roll of the Genetic Dice” there are prime examples of both rational and non-rational action. In the first article, “So Eager for Grandchildren,…show more content…
The first example I found of rational action is how the Kretchmar’s chose their sperm donor. Author Jacqueline Mrozmay explains, “The donor they chose was a family man, a Christian like them, they were told. Most important, he had a clean bill of health”. I believe that this is an example of rational action because the family took time to think about the kinds of qualities they wanted their donor to have. They did this in a logical manner, not guided by emotion or tradition. Another great example of rational action from this article is how some of the bigger sperm banks want to make a national donor gamete registry. The author clarifies, “Such a registry might help prevent the spread of genetic diseases among donor children by providing a way for parents to report children’s illnesses to their sperm banks, thus allowing banks to weed out donors who may be carriers” (Mrozmay). This is an example of rational action because it is well thought out and deliberate. The goal of the registry would be to eliminate any donors that could cause harm to children and make them ill. It appears that some of the larger sperm banks have come up with a logical way to do…show more content…
The concept of his that I would like to focus on is alienated labor. Alienated labor is the result of the economic and social organization of capitalist production. Marx specifies four different types of alienation. These include: alienation from products produced, alienation within the production process, alienation of workers from their species being, and alienation of individuals from one another. The main two forms of alienation found in this article are alienation of workers from their species being and alienation of individuals from one another. Alienation of workers from their species being is when wage workers are reduced to their use-value and then become separated from the creativity and higher consciousness that differentiate the human wage workers from animals. Alienation of individuals from one another sounds more self explanatory. This form of alienation is seen when the competitive production process and workplace demands alienate individuals from one another. When this occurs, instead of sticking together, the wage workers turn on each
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