Mayamma Poem Analysis

1126 Words5 Pages
The recollections of Mayamma’s past life provided an insight into her battered, violence-filled existence. While her husband called her “a shameless hussy” (111), and kicked her “after a night of whoring in the rain” (111), her mother-in-law fed her yesterday’s rice because “What is the use of feeding a barren woman” (112) and “smeared the burning red, freshly ground spices into my barrenness” (113) because she was found admiring her new saree. Later, her mother in law asked her to cut her breast open and “take the silver cup with the blood from your breast and bathe the lingam” (113) inorder to propitiate the gods so as to begot a son. Yet Mayamma never questioned these atrocities, never raised a voice or a finger or tried to run away from…show more content…
According to Devi: “Mayamma had been thrown into the waters of her womanhood well before she had learnt to swim. She had learnt about lust, the potential of unhidden bestial cruelty, first hand…she snarls and sulks… but she has no bitterness” (135-36). She made no choices in her own life but yet lived through other women like Parvatiamma and later even Devi. In approving of Parvatiamm’s decision to leave her home and family and go in search of the meaning of life, she showed a surprising and indefatigable strength. She holded the family together then and continued to care for Mahesh and his house even when Devi walked out on them. Her life and experiences were totally different from those of Sita who was probably born just fifteen years after…show more content…
Hariharan urged that the many disruption of civil society had created opportunities as well as hazards, which simultaneously enabled and constrained Indian woman. Even at lower levels of privilege some sense of personal rights percolated into their consciousness so that the stereotype Indian woman as a submissive, mindless object of pity found no concrete example. These stereotypes existed only for many distanced onlookers and underlined the politics of representation. The present article depicted how far Hariharan had succeeded in picturizing the concepts womanhood and in describing the relevance of this concepts in the modern Indian society. Gita Hariharan’s novel The Thousand Faces of Night delineates Indian women’s lives – where most dreams were ruined and the only constant was
Open Document