Maze Runner And Nineteen Eighty Four: A Literary Analysis

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The Maze Runner by James Dashner and Nineteen Eighty Four by George Orwell are two novels with many contrasting ideas. Although both authors wrote their books to appeal to different time periods, Dashner and Orwell both develop the idea of the necessity of freedom throughout their novel. This idea is brought up in both novels by using extended metaphors to represent life, the illustration of authoritarian governments and the theme of hope. In The Maze Runner by James Dashner the maze is an extended metaphor. Similarly in George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty Four Oceania represents and extended metaphor as well. In both novels the characters struggle to regain their freedom from the authoritarian governments. The Maze is a representation of life and all its challenges. It is mentioned in the novel…show more content…
In Nineteen Eighty Four Winston’s hope to live in a better world over powers his thought when reading Goldstein’s book. In The Maze Runner hope is the one thing that keeps all the Gladers motivated to fight for their freedom. Thomas shook his head. “No, you don’t get it. They’re weeding us out, seeing if we’ll give up, finding the best of us. Throwing variables at us, trying to make us quit. Testing our ability to hope and fight. Sending Teresa here and shutting everything down was only the last part, one more...final analysis. Now it’s time for the last test. To escape.” (Dashner, 301) The quote is important because it states the reason they need hope. Hope is significant in a number of ways it is what helps develop the climax of the novel. Hope leads them to complete the maze which is the purpose of the maze. Similarly in Nineteen Eighty Four the book written by Goldstein is a representation of hope when winston reads the book he get a sense go hope that every lie that Big Brother has told is not proven wrong. By reading the book Winston finally got all the answers he needed about the

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