Mean Girls Analysis

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The late 90’s and early 00s is the Golden Age of chick flicks, which is a movie genre that has women as the primary-targeted audience. There’s countless of iconic films from the perspective of teenage girls or young women as they navigate high school and real world. That’s the era of romantic comedies where the tone of the storytelling is sardonic and swoon worthy. Couples have meet-cute moments, high-school-dance scene where the hero sweep off the heroine’s in her feet. Mean Girls do fall into this genre’s convention. It’s a 2004 American teen-comedy directed by Mark Waters.
Synopsis
Mean Girls follows Cady Heron. She and her zoologist parents just returned from their 12-year trip in Africa. She was socially inept that is due to being homeschooled
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It’s not perfect; however, there are several great themes that was tackled in a sensible way. The main prose is how an innocent sixteen-year-old girl Cady, who’s attending public school for the first time, has been introduce to the melting pot of high-school environment. She will experience the wildest rites of passage of being a teen. The viewers will see her growth as a character and a teenager as she befriends new people, and fall in love. The movie employed harmful gendered stereotypes that are often damaging to young women if not challenged. The plot includes the juxtapose images of “good” and “bad” women, stifling beauty standards, nonverbal and verbal language, parental modeling, stereotypes of women, sexual themes, and other relevant issues.
Female Characters

Mean Girls divides young girls into two different categories. There’s good girl like Cady, who’s a rule follower, and bad girls like the Plastics, who’s cruel to everyone. Regina and her friends are portrayed in the most superficial way. As Gretchen would say, they live in a “girl world” with their own set of rules. Per example in Wednesday, “they wear pink.” If you don’t follow that, you can’t sit with them. It basically translates to: you’re out of the
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