Rene Descarte's Theory Of Knowledge

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Rene Descartes is quoted in Latin proposition denoted as “Cogito ergo sum,” which can be translated to mean I think, therefore I am. In the context, the speaker indicates that there is a need to attain a foundation of knowledge to understand the objects that exist in the world. Apparently, he states that his beliefs often deceive him and this creates a cloud of doubt. In fact, he states that he has been deceived before by his own certainty and he proposes that individuals should evaluate to their experiences about this issue. For instance, he states that he may be dreaming of an existing god yet this could be an illusion of a deceitful demon or he may be insane to have such a preposterous thinking (Descartes, Kennington and Frank, 14). Ideally,…show more content…
For instance, it is noted as an important subject in western philosophy as it highlights the forms of knowledge foundation especially with the radical uncertainty that was brought forward. In fact, it is explained that there are inventions and imaginations that make people to have a perception about various aspects of life. Secondly, individuals can make mistakes and convince people to take their decree about situation and this may mislead the entire population. Thirdly, he states that deceit is prevalent in the world and many people are victims of this since they believe in the information that they receive although they may not affirm the facts. Due to this insinuations, it is evident that Descartes proved that people live although in doubt of their own existence (Descartes and Mike, 14). For this reason, the proof that people are in existence is all in the mind yet the individuals cannot provide evidence that they have a mind. Incidentally, he states that there is a thinking entity in an individual, and this constitutes the thoughts that people…show more content…
Ideally, there is a need for immediate clarity supported by self-evidence to define a justified position through endless circumstances of doubt. Importantly, he states that some processes need to be included in the definition of existence so that the audience can affirm realistic point of view. In many cases, he states that people use perceptions that they build over time to determine that a specific object exists although these are creations of the thought process. For instance, people know that they have a mind in their head but they may not confirm the scope of work and its functionality yet they believe in the things that they see, hear and touch. Thus, people understand their environment by using the knowledge that they have through experiences and use this to describe and mention objects. For example, the human race believes that clouds are in the sky and they can identify them and even name them yet they have never touched the clouds. On the same note, people may make drawings and illustrations of clouds yet they have not had firsthand experience (Descartes, Kennington and Frank, 15). Therefore, it is evident that people believe the anecdotes they hear and they use such notions to create a perception about the existence of some objects in the world. However, the statement indicates that the author can
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