Memory Pattern In Catcher In The Rye

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10 Literary assignments by: Chance Weston

Introduction: How'd He Do That? How do memory, symbol, and pattern affect the reading of literature? How does the recognition of patterns make it easier to read complicated literature? Discuss how your appreciation of your summer reading novel was enhanced by understanding symbol or pattern. Memory affects the reading of literature because it helps you make connections and will assist in recognize patterns in the novel. Patterns, in turn, can reveal hidden meanings and truths in the text, for instance, if something is mentioned repeatedly through out the novel, that's a large clue that it is of extreme importance to completely comprehending the piece of literature. Symbols reveal to you what text
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Located in the northern part of the United States allowed the author to bring in literary concept of a winter season, and thus winter break into the novel. Had the location been in the deep south such as Texas, we would likely gotten a different set of events and setting that could have lead to a very different story. Another characteristic is the city and culture of New York itself. New York City is packed full of people that Holden considers to be “phony” and he can find them wherever he turns, whether it be an old friend, a nightclub, or a Broadway show. The general seedy undercurrent of the large city allows him to slip into said nightclubs with no issues and even experience a prostitute and subsequent mugging in a dinky hotel. The Characteristics of Holden himself also fall under what is considered geography. Holden is an intelligent and sensitive person, yet his narration is in a cynical and jaded voice. He uses his cynicism in an attempt to protect himself from the hypocrisy and ugliness of the world around him and the pain and disappointment of the world. The criticisms that Holden targets people with are also projected towards himself. He is uncomfortable with his own perceived weaknesses, and at times displays as much “phoniness”, cruelty, and superficiality as anyone else in the novel. This of course is reflected in his story and is a catalyst for shaping the…show more content…
The boy was, to Holden, a very nice person and not phony, but was tormented by the other boys, the so-called phonies. This type of violence is more of a second hand violence, as it is not experienced directly. Then there is a more personal violence, which Holden has experienced more than once during the novel. One prominent moment of violence was his fight with Stradlater. The fight lead him to being bloodied and beaten up. Both kinds of violence had an effect on Holden though in different ways. The first example had a more long term effect on Holden, the story of the boy drove home Holden's idea about how hard it is to be truly yourself when you are always being pressured into conforming or becoming a phony, and the boy becomes a symbol of the struggle to Holden and perhaps fuel for his hatred of phonies and maturation. The other kind effected Holden in the short term but still caused him to make rash actions shortly after the fight. Though most of the damage done to Holden was external pain and didn't have a totally lasting effect on his

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