Mental Case Study: Winnie The Pooh

911 Words4 Pages
A Mental case study: “Winnie the Pooh”: Winnie the Pooh: “Winnie the Pooh” was created by English Author A.A. Milne in 1962 and the feature film created by Walt Disney Productions was released in 1977. Within the feature film there are many appealing characters that the audience can identify with. Not only are these characters perceived as lively and expressive but each individual character represents a specific mental disorder. “Winnie the Pooh”, is one of the main characters within the film, he embodies the theory of comorbidity (the presence of one or more disease or disorder). Winnie signifies Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), OCD and eating disorder due to his addiction with honey. Winnie’s addiction has been strongly performed…show more content…
Thus it can be expected that his ‘general anxiety disorder’ was caused due to prior traumatic life events therefore initiating him to act and react in this specific way. However Piglet is drawn to the tranquil presence of Winnie and the two characters share similar injuries to their self- esteem, allowing them to relate to one another. Owl: In the story of “Winnie the Pooh”, Owl is one of the most knowledgeable but yet his character still signifies the disorder, Dyslexia. This disorder is when the individual struggles to read or interpret words, letters or other symbols. However this condition does not affect their general intelligence. These characteristics are prominent within the character Owl, although he loves to read and write, he constantly makes mistakes with spelling and this is evident within his written works. However he often attempts to cover up his mistakes within his…show more content…
Nevertheless his character portrays a severe case of ‘ADHD’. His form of ADHD focused more on the hyperactivity and this can be spotted through his actions and his persistent bouncing, “Bouncing is what Tiggers do best”. Tigger is continuously hyperactive to an uncontrollable amount and often times assumes that the other characters want to be involved in his activities too. Throughout the film Tigger is seen as a bad role model to the other characters that inhabit the same universe as him. Tigger has an impulsive personality and is continuously taking risks. The risks that he often takes are notably bad to the younger characters that are in his presence, for example he often leads Roo into dangerous situations as Roo is just a baby kangaroo and the instinct of a child is to look up to their elders. Therefore emphasising that Tigger does possess the right characteristics to be a good role model. Yet Tigger is unaware of the probable outcome his experimentation and risk-taking behaviour will get him and how it will come to affect other characters that surround
Open Document